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Lowell Courses

Biology and Evolution of Anthropoda

Lowell

81.537/539

A detailed examination of phylum Arthropoda from developmental, ecological, genetic, morphological and paleontological perspectives. Specific topics include arthropod origins and relationships to proto-arthropods, the evolution of segmentation, and current perspectives on relationships within the phylum.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 81.306 Invertebrate Zoology; 81.308 Invertebrate Zoology Lab; 81.426 Evolutionary Biology and Co- req: 81.539 Biology and Evolution of Arthropoda Lab.

3 Credits.

Option areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|OHH

Advanced Aerodynamics (UML Graduate Course)

Lowell
22.583

Fundamentals of subsonic and supersonic aerodynamics. Atmosphere models, air-speed measurement, and aerodynamic heating. Circulation, downwash, and three-dimensional wing theory. Airfoil data, and lift and drag of aircraft components. Compressibility effects on drag, and airfoils and wings in supersonic and hypersonic flow. Aircraft performance calculations. Fundamentals of orbital mechanics. Special project required in supersonic wind tunnel testing or orbital mechanics.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: MOT|MASMA

Advanced Fluid Mechanics

Lowell
22.581

This course covers fundamental equations of fluid motion, kinematics, vorticity, circulation, Crocco’s theorem, Kelvin’s theorem, Helmholtz’s vorticity laws, secondary flows; stream function, velocity potential, and potential flows; unsteady Bernoulli equation and gravity water waves.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Partial Differential Equations I (92.545) or equivalent.

Option Areas: MOT|MASMA

Advanced Invertebrate Zoology (UML Graduate Course)

Lowell
81.557

This course is an elective.

3 credits.

Co-Req: 81.559 Adv Invertebrate Zoology Lab

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|OHH

Advanced Invertebrate Zoology Lab (UML Graduate Course)

Lowell
81.559

This course is an elective.

1 credit.

Co-Req: 81.557 Adv Invertebrate Zoology

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|OHH

Advanced Synoptic Meteorology

Lowell
85.502

This course is designed for graduate students who have a strong background in mathematics and physics, but whose meteorology preparation is weak. The basic concepts of weather forecasting and analysis on synoptic scales are covered theoretically as well as in application to case studies and current weather. The coursework encourages the development of three-dimensional visualization techniques and an appreciation of the physics which controls weather systems.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: MOT|MASMA

Air Pollution Phenomenology

Lowell
85.571

The course centers on transport, dispersion and transformation of air pollutants in the atmosphere. The atmospheric structure and dynamics are reviewed. The atmospheric dispersion equation is developed for instantaneous and steady state releases of pollutants, including the Gaussian Plume Equation for point, line and area sources. The sources and transport of particulate matter are discussed, including haze and visibility impairment. Other topics are photo-oxidants (ozone), acid deposition, stratospheric ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: MASMA

Air Quality Modeling

Lowell
85.674

This course focuses on computer applications of air dispersion models. Students will be expected to exercise the Gaussian plume models developed by EPA. Also, reactive-dispersion modeling will be practiced, that is, models in which primary pollutants react with themselves, or with atmospheric species to produce secondary pollutants. Examples are acid deposition, photo-oxidant and aerosol models. In addition, spreadsheet calculations will be used for some analyses.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: MASMA

Atmospheric Structure and Dynamics

Lowell
85.515

The temperature, pressure and density structure of the atmosphere are reviewed, as well as the chemical composition. Topics include atmospheric and solar radiation, atmospheric heat budget and the hypsometric equation. Dynamics of the atmosphere explores the behavior of fluids on a rotating earth, global circulation, synoptic scale motions, perturbation theory of wave motions. Elements of climatic change and the effects of anthropogenic emissions on climate and weather will also be discussed.

This course is an elective

3 credits

Option Areas: MASMA

Boundary Layer Meteorology

Lowell
85.501

This course draws upon the equations of motion in the atmosphere to develop a theoretical understanding of the atmospheric boundary layer. This understanding is compared with real observations taken with the Department’s rawinsonde equipment, as well as published data. The emphasis is on blending theory and practice to enhance the student’s understanding of the behavior of the atmosphere.

This course is an elective.

3 credits.

Option Areas: MOT|MASMA

Chemical Oceanography

Lowell
84.653

This intercampus chemical oceanography class is designed to combine expertise from Dr. Mark Altabet (Dartmouth Campus) and Dr. David Ryan (Lowell Campus) to give students at different campuses a learning opportunity from leading active research professors in chemical oceanography.

This course fulfills the Chemical Oceanography core course requirement.

3 credits.

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|MBEC|MOT|MASMA|OHH

Climate Change: Science, Communication, and Solutions (UML Graduate Course)

Lowell
81.516

This course is an elective.

4 credits

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|MBEC|OHH

Environmental Chemistry

Lowell
84.519

Covers chemical processes and measurements in marine and estuarine systems. Emphasis isplaced on water column processes; however, air-water and sediment-water interface phenomenaare covered as well. Topics include but are not limited to: ionic equilibria, trace metalcomplexation, redox processes, mathematical modeling applied to chemical systems, and oceanographic sampling.

This course fulfills the Chemical Oceanography core course requirements.

3 credits

Option Areas: CSS|LMRSM|MBEC|MASMA|OHH

Environmental Fate and Transport

Lowell
14.568

The fate of contaminants in the environment is controlled by transport processes within a single medium and between media. The similarities in contaminant dispersion within air, surface water and ground water will be emphasized. Interphase transport processes such as volatilization and adsorption will then be considered from an equilibrium perspective followed by the kinetics of mass transfer across environmental interfaces.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: LMRSM|MBEC

Environmental Microbiology

Lowell
81.504

Examination of microbial communities in natural and artificial environments and interactions between microorganisms and their abiotic environments. Consideration is given to the role of microorganisms in the flux of energy and matter through ecosystems at molecular, ecosystem, and global scales; microbial consortia and symbioses; and modern techniques in environmental microbiology.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: CSS|LMRSM|MBEC|OHH

Geographic Information Systems

Lowell
87.504

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: MASMA

Geological Oceanography

Lowell
85.582

A graduate level course dealing with the geology of the ocean basins and their margins. A prior course in geology is not a prerequisite. The course will have four themes: (1) the structure of the ocean basins, (2) ocean margins, (3) ocean sediments and (4) ocean history.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|MBEC|MOT|MASMA|OHH

Introduction to Probability and Statistics II

Lowell
92.519

The course combines theory with applications and covers both fundamental topics in statistical inference and their applications in data analysis. Discussions of the theoretical topics of statistical estimation and hypotheses testing will be complemented by analyzing simulated and real data sets. The course is taught at the computer lab equipped with MINITAB, SAS and other packages. Students will learn how statistical theory helps using statistical software, how to choose the right tool for the problem at hand and how to interpret the output. Topics to be covered include point and interval estimation, hypotheses testing, maximum likelihood estimation, likelihood ratio and related tests, applications of statistical inference to commonly used statistical models, such as one-sample, two-sample and many-sample (ANOVA) models, linear regression models, goodness-of-fit tests and contingency tables, and elements of statistical quality control and experimental design. Time permitting, topics in nonparametric and robust statistics will also be covered.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Probability and Mathematical Statistics (92.509) or equivalent.

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|MBEC|MOT|MASMA|OHH

Invertebrate Zoology II (UML Graduate Course)

Lowell
81.513

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Co-Req: 81.515 Invertebrate Zoology Lab II

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|OHH

Invertebrate Zoology II Lab (UML Graduate Course)

Lowell
81.515

This course is an elective.

1 credit

Co-Req: 81.513 Invertebrate Zoology II

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|OHH

Limnology

Lowell
18.502

Limnology is a lecture course which covers the basic elements of limnology, which has been described as the study of the functional relationships and productivity of non-marine (i.e., freshwater and estuarine) communities as they are affected by the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment. Starting with the origins of lake basins in the landscape, the course presents key concepts for understanding how lakes work and are affected by man. These concepts (e.g., heat budgets, lake circulation patterns, nutrient budgets) are incorporated with the lake biota (e.g., phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish) and synthesized to provide perspective on ecosystem structure and function. While the emphasis is on lakes and ponds, the course also examines the stream environment and its function. Finally, the course considers man-made stresses for lake and stream systems and provides the tools to diagnosis and restore aquatic resources.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: CSS|LMRSM|OHH

Ocean Engineering

Lowell
22.584

Physical Properties of the Ocean Environment, ocean wave mechanics, computer solutions of wave interactions, physical modeling of marine vehicles and coastal environments (modeling and scaling laws), resistance and propulsion of surface ships and submarines, and forces on floating and submerged objects such as buoys, pipelines, piers, and breakwaters. Research report required summarizing some aspect of ocean engineering.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: ICM|MOT|MASMA

Paleoclimatology

Lowell
89.501

This course provides students with an overview of paleoclimatology by examining the use of proxy records, such as marine and lake sediment sequences, ice cores, tree rings, corals and historical data to reconstruct past climatic conditions. Dating methods will be introduced. Throughout, we will critically analyze our understanding of past climates and environments and identify directions for future research. Topics include: abrupt climate change, human evolution and climate, biosphere-climate interactions and paleoclimate.

Option areas: CSS|ICM|MBEC|MASMA|OHH

Physical and Chemical Hydrogeology

Lowell
14.562

Well hydraulics for the analysis of groundwater movement. A review of the processes of diffusion, dispersion, sorption, and retardation as related to the fate and transport of organic contaminants in groundwater systems. Factors influencing multi-dimensional contaminant plume formation and migration are addressed. It is the goal of this course to provide environmental scientists and engineers with the technical skills required to understand groundwater hydrology and contaminant transport within aquifers. A term paper and professional presentation in class regarding a relevant topic is required.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: LMRSM|MBEC

Probability and Mathematical Statistics

Lowell
92.509

This course provides a solid basis for further study in statistics and data analysis or in pattern recognition and operations research. It is especially appropriate for students with an undergraduate science or engineering major who have not had a rigorous calculus-based probability and statistics course. The course covers the topics in probability models, random variables, expected values, important discrete and continuous distributions, limit theorems, and basic problems of statistical inference: estimation and testing.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|MBEC|MOT|MASMA|OHH

Quantitative Geomorphology

Lowell
89.502

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|MBEC|MASMA|OHH

Regional Hydrogeology

Lowell
89.524

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|MBEC|MOT

Regional Weather and Climate Modeling (UML Graduate Course)

Lowell
85.51

This course is an elective

3 credits

Option Areas: MBEC|MOT|MASMA

Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere

Lowell
85.503

This course is a survey of ground based, balloon, rocket probe, radar and satellite remote sensing techniques. Optical and radio frequency remote sensing techniques are surveyed. The focus is on the determination of physical, chemical and dynamical quantities by remote sensing measurements. The theory is presented used to interpret data obtained by remote sensing techniques. Various inversion methods are discussed used to obtain spatial discrete quantities from line-of-sight observations. Modeling and simulation techniques are described and practiced.

This course is an elective.

3 credits.

Option Areas: MASMA

Simple Atmospheric Models (UML Graduate Course)

Lowell
85.524

This course is an elective.

3 credits.

Option Areas: MASMA

The Climate System (UML Graduate Course)

Lowell
85.508

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: MOT|MASMA

Wastewater Treatment and Storm Water Management Systems

Lowell
14.57

The era of massive subsidies for construction of sanitary sewers and centralized, publically operated treatment works (POTWs) has passed. Non – point pollution from sources such as onsite disposal systems has become a major focus of concern in our efforts to protect and improve ground and surface water quality. Much of the new construction in areas not already served by centralized collection and treatment must use the alternative technologies. This course is design oriented. The variously available technologies are studied in depth. Students evaluate various technologies as they may be applied to a complex problem for which information is available, and develop an optimum problem solution.

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|MOT|OHH

Water Resource System Assessment

Lowell
18.51

The course is designed to build understanding of the technologies and methods of analysis of water resource management issues and of the interdependence they have to each other when real problems must be evaluated. It presumes no prior background in any water related technology. The emphasis is upon building understanding of fundamental concepts in order to apply them to the management of water resources. Management in this case implies resolution of conflicts in technology utilization of a resource because of scarcity or incompatibility of competing possible uses. Hypothetical cases are resolved to aid in converting concepts into reasonable applications to problems.

This course is an elective.

3 credits.

Calculus I and II.

Option Areas: CSS|ICM

Wetlands Ecology

Lowell
18.501

This course is an elective.

3 credits

Option Areas: CSS|ICM|LMRSM|MBEC

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